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What the Detroit Lions’ Variable Ticket Pricing Means For You

Dec 16, 2013; Detroit, MI, USA; Detroit Lions fans hold up a sign for wide receiver Calvin Johnson (not pictured) during the second quarter against the Baltimore Ravens at Ford Field. Mandatory Credit: Tim Fuller-USA TODAY Sports

The Detroit Lions will be instituting a variable pricing structure for all tickets during the 2014 season. What this means for you depends on your situation.

First, it pretty much means nothing for season ticket holders. Information provided by the team states that preseason games will be dropped by 70%. That sounds like a nice drop, and while it is, the Lions will make it up elsewhere. Four regular season games have been designated at the “touchdown” level while four games have been designated at the “field goal” level.

For season ticket holders, those preseason savings are simply shifted to cover the increased cost of the touchdown games so that season ticket holders will basically pay what they have paid in the past, after accounting for typical season holder discounts and an overall price increase for 2014.

The big impact comes for the fan who likes to just pick out a game or two to attend each year. If that’s a preseason game, this is a win, although cheap tickets have always been available through secondary marketplaces like StubHub. Now, lower cost tickets will be available straight from the box office.

If you’re a fan who likes to pick out one of the biggest matchups of the year, this is a loss for you as the box office price for games against the Bears, Packers, Saints and the Thanksgiving opponent will be more expensive than the other four regular season games.

So, why make the change? The Lions acknowledge using data from the secondary market to help drive their decision. By driving up the face value of those games, while driving down the cost of preseason games, the Lions position themselves to capture more ticket money that would otherwise flow through secondary markets like StubHub without impacting season ticket holders.

Topics: Detroit Lions

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